ephod

ephod

[ef-od, ee-fod]
noun Judaism.
a richly embroidered, apronlike vestment having two shoulder straps and ornamental attachments for securing the breastplate, worn with a waistband by the high priest. Ex. 28:6, 7, 25–28.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin < Hebrew ēphōd, apparently meaning “idol” in some passages

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
ephod (ˈiːfɒd)
 
n
Old Testament an embroidered vestment believed to resemble an apron with shoulder straps, worn by priests in ancient Israel
 
[C14: from Hebrew ēphōdh]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ephod
Hebrew span class="foreign">ephod, from aphad to put on.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Ephod definition


something girt, a sacred vestment worn originally by the high priest (Ex. 28:4), afterwards by the ordinary priest (1 Sam. 22:18), and characteristic of his office (1 Sam. 2:18, 28; 14:3). It was worn by Samuel, and also by David (2 Sam. 6:14). It was made of fine linen, and consisted of two pieces, which hung from the neck, and covered both the back and front, above the tunic and outer garment (Ex. 28:31). That of the high priest was embroidered with divers colours. The two pieces were joined together over the shoulders (hence in Latin called superhumerale) by clasps or buckles of gold or precious stones, and fastened round the waist by a "curious girdle of gold, blue, purple, and fine twined linen" (28:6-12). The breastplate, with the Urim and Thummim, was attached to the ephod.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

ephod

part of the ceremonial dress of the high priest of ancient Israel described in the Old Testament (Ex. 28:6-8; 39:2-5). It was worn outside the robe and probably kept in place by a girdle and by shoulder pieces, from which hung the breast piece (or pouch) containing the sacred lots (divinatory objects), Urim and Thummim, whose precise function is now unknown. It is uncertain whether the ephod covered the back, encircling the body like a kind of waistcoat, or only the front. It was not a garment in the ordinary sense, and its association with the sacred lots indicates that the ephod was used for divination.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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