epode

epode

[ep-ohd]
noun
1.
Classical Prosody. a kind of lyric poem, invented by Archilochus, in which a long verse is followed by a short one.
2.
the part of a lyric ode following the strophe and antistrophe and composing with them a triadic unit.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Latin epōdos < Greek epōidós an aftersong, singing after. See ep-, ode

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Collins
World English Dictionary
epode (ˈɛpəʊd)
 
n
1.  the part of a lyric ode that follows the strophe and the antistrophe
2.  a type of lyric poem composed of couplets in which a long line is followed by a shorter one, invented by Archilochus
 
[C16: via Latin from Greek epōidos a singing after, from epaidein to sing after, from aidein to sing]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

epode
1598, a kind of lyric poem in which a short line follows a longer one (invented by Archilochus, also used by Horace), from Gk. epodus "after-song, incantation," from epi "after" + odein "to sing."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

epode

a verse form composed of two lines differing in construction and often in metre, the second shorter than the first. In Greek lyric odes, an epode is the third part of the three-part structure of the poem, following the strophe and the antistrophe. The word is from the Greek epoidos, "sung" or "said after."

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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