eponym

[ep-uh-nim]
noun
1.
a person, real or imaginary, from whom something, as a tribe, nation, or place, takes or is said to take its name: Brut, the supposed grandson of Aeneas, is the eponym of the Britons.
2.
a word based on or derived from a person's name.
3.
any ancient official whose name was used to designate his year of office.

Origin:
1840–50; back formation from eponymous

eponymic, adjective
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World English Dictionary
eponym (ˈɛpəˌnɪm)
 
n
1.  a name, esp a place name, derived from the name of a real or mythical person, as for example Constantinople from Constantine I
2.  the name of the person from which such a name is derived: in the Middle Ages, "Brutus" was thought to be the eponym of "Britain"
 
[C19: from Greek epōnumos giving a significant name]
 
epo'nymic
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

eponym
1846, from Gk. eponymos given as a name, from epi upon + onoma (see name). One whose name becomes that of a place, a people, an era, an institution, etc.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

eponym ep·o·nym (ěp'ə-nĭm')
n.
A name of a drug, structure, or disease based on or derived from the name of a person.


ep'o·nym'ic adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

eponym

one for whom or which something is or is believed to be named. The word can refer, for example, to the usually mythical ancestor or totem animal or object that a social group (such as a tribe) holds to be the origin of its name. In its most familiar use, eponym denotes a person for whom a place or thing is named, as in describing James Monroe as the eponym of Monrovia, Liberia. The derivative adjective is eponymous. An eponymous hero of a work of literature is one whose name is the title of the work, such as Anne Bronte's Agnes Grey, Charles Dickens's David Copperfield, and John Fowles's Daniel Martin.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Worse, his name became an eponym for someone who betrays his own country by helping the enemy.
He reorganized the data, he shifted the paradigm, he deserves the eponym.
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