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[ih-kweyt] /ɪˈkweɪt/
verb (used with object), equated, equating.
to regard, treat, or represent as equivalent:
We cannot equate the possession of wealth with goodness.
to state the equality of or between; put in the form of an equation:
to equate growing prosperity with the physical health of a nation.
to reduce to an average; make such correction or allowance in as will reduce to a common standard of comparison.
Origin of equate
late Middle English
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin aequātus (past participle of aequāre to make equal), equivalent to aequ(us) equal + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
equatability, noun
equatable, adjective
unequated, adjective Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for equated
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Epine, the French for thorn, is ultimately akin to Hobany, and hip may evidently be equated with the friendly Hob.

    Archaic England Harold Bayley
  • It seems clear that Satyagraha cannot be equated with Christian pacifism.

    Introduction to Non-Violence Theodore Paullin
  • We are entitled to ask several questions before the one can be equated with the other.

  • Indeed, thinkers wiser than myself have equated the whole upward course of culture with this poignant quest.

    Bread Overhead Fritz Reuter Leiber
  • There is no doubt that at the time of Domesday the hide was equated with 120 and not with 30 acres.

British Dictionary definitions for equated


verb (mainly transitive)
to make or regard as equivalent or similar, esp in order to compare or balance
(maths) to indicate the equality of; form an equation from
(intransitive) to be equal; correspond
Derived Forms
equatable, adjective
equatability, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin aequāre to make equal
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for equated



early 15c., from Latin aequatus "level, levelled, even," past participle of aequare "make even or uniform, make equal," from aequus "level, even, equal" (see equal (adj.)). Earliest use in English was of astrological calculation, then "to make equal;" meaning "to regard as equal" is early 19c. Related: Equated; equating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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