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abate

[uh-beyt] /əˈbeɪt/
verb (used with object), abated, abating.
1.
to reduce in amount, degree, intensity, etc.; lessen; diminish:
to abate a tax; to abate one's enthusiasm.
2.
Law.
  1. to put an end to or suppress (a nuisance).
  2. to suspend or extinguish (an action).
  3. to annul (a writ).
3.
to deduct or subtract:
to abate part of the cost.
4.
to omit:
to abate all mention of names.
5.
to remove, as in stone carving, or hammer down, as in metalwork, (a portion of a surface) in order to produce a figure or pattern in low relief.
verb (used without object), abated, abating.
6.
to diminish in intensity, violence, amount, etc.:
The storm has abated. The pain in his shoulder finally abated.
7.
Law. to end; become null and void.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English < Middle French abatre to beat down, equivalent to a- a-5 + batre < Late Latin batere for Latin battuere to beat; a- perhaps also understood as a-3
Related forms
abatable, adjective
abater; Law. abator, noun
unabatable, adjective
unabating, adjective
unabatingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. decrease, weaken. 6. subside.
Antonyms
1, 6. increase, intensify.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for abated
  • Now that the cold war has eased, collective fears of nuclear catastrophe may have abated.
  • Taken after heavy monsoon rains abated and sky presented a golden hue during the evening sunset.
  • Both companies have abated their cash crunches through financial maneuvers.
  • While stocks rose, the anxiety gripping the credit markets barely abated.
  • The violence did not stop, though it has somewhat abated.
  • Even as our economy has grown larger, smog has also abated.
  • The excitement relative to yesterday's tragedy has abated but little, if any.
  • Certainly, speculative attacks on the peg have abated.
  • When the panic has abated the euro zone must redesign its currency.
  • The noise, crowding and traffic that had accompanied their arrival over the past decade abated.
British Dictionary definitions for abated

abate

/əˈbeɪt/
verb
1.
to make or become less in amount, intensity, degree, etc: the storm has abated
2.
(transitive) (law)
  1. to remove, suppress, or terminate (a nuisance)
  2. to suspend or extinguish (a claim or action)
  3. to annul (a writ)
3.
(intransitive) (law) (of a writ, legal action, etc) to become null and void
4.
(transitive) to subtract or deduct, as part of a price
Word Origin
C14: from Old French abatre to beat down, fell
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for abated

abate

v.

"put an end to" (c.1300); "to grow less, diminish in power or influence" (early 14c.), from Old French abattre "beat down, cast down," from Vulgar Latin *abbatere, from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + battuere "to beat" (see batter (v.)). Secondary sense of "to fell, slaughter" is in abatis and abattoir. Related: Abated; abating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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