eradicate

[ih-rad-i-keyt]
verb (used with object), eradicated, eradicating.
1.
to remove or destroy utterly; extirpate: to eradicate smallpox throughout the world.
2.
to erase by rubbing or by means of a chemical solvent: to eradicate a spot.
3.
to pull up by the roots: to eradicate weeds.

Origin:
1555–65; < Latin ērādīcātus rooted out (past participle of ērādīcāre), equivalent to ē- e-1 + rādīc- (stem of rādīx) root1 + -ātus -ate1

eradicant [ih-rad-i-kuhnt] , adjective, noun
eradication, noun
eradicative, adjective
eradicator, noun
noneradicative, adjective
uneradicated, adjective
uneradicative, adjective


1. obliterate, uproot, exterminate, annihilate. See abolish.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
eradicate (ɪˈrædɪˌkeɪt)
 
vb
1.  to obliterate; stamp out
2.  to pull or tear up by the roots
 
[C16: from Latin ērādīcāre to uproot, from ex-1 + rādīx root]
 
e'radicable
 
adj
 
e'radicably
 
adv
 
eradi'cation
 
n
 
e'radicative
 
adj
 
e'radicator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

eradicate
mid-16c., from L. eradicat-, pp. stem of eradicare (see eradication). Related: Eradicated; eradicating.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
However, eradicating mosquitoes to solve these diseases is akin to having a surgeon use a sledge hammer to remove a brain tumor.
Good governance and sustained economic growth are key to eradicating poverty.
There is certainly little risk of eradicating the blues.
Money for eradicating noxious aquatic weeds comes from boat-license fees.
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