erudite

[er-yoo-dahyt, er-oo-]
adjective
characterized by great knowledge; learned or scholarly: an erudite professor; an erudite commentary. educated, knowledgeable; wise, sapient.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin ērudītus, equivalent to ērud- (ē- e-1 + rud- unformed, rough, rude) + -ītus -ite2

eruditely, adverb
eruditeness, noun
nonerudite, adjective
noneruditely, adverb
noneruditeness, noun
unerudite, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
erudite (ˈɛrʊˌdaɪt)
 
adj
having or showing extensive scholarship; learned
 
[C15: from Latin ērudītus, from ērudīre to polish, from ex-1 + rudis unpolished, rough]
 
'eruditely
 
adv
 
erudition
 
n
 
'eruditeness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

erudite
early 15c., from L. eruditus, pp. of erudire "instruct," from ex- "out" + rudis "unskilled, rude."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
For all her erudite charm, she'll need to don even more armor to be ready for
  September's scrutiny.
The book is learned, even erudite, and sure to be controversial.
The papers were as usual, but one struck me as being exceptionally erudite.
The book is an erudite joke carried off with verve and humor.
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