escrow

[n. es-kroh, ih-skroh; v. ih-skroh, es-kroh] Law.
noun
1.
a contract, deed, bond, or other written agreement deposited with a third person, by whom it is to be delivered to the grantee or promisee on the fulfillment of some condition.
verb (used with object)
2.
to place in escrow: The home seller agrees to escrow the sum of $1000 with his attorney.
Idioms
3.
in escrow, in the keeping of a third person for delivery to a given party upon the fulfillment of some condition.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Anglo-French escro(u)we, Old French escro(u)e. See scroll

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
escrow (ˈɛskrəʊ, ɛˈskrəʊ)
 
n
1.  money, goods, or a written document, such as a contract bond, delivered to a third party and held by him pending fulfilment of some condition
2.  the state or condition of being an escrow (esp in the phrase in escrow)
 
vb
3.  to place (money, a document, etc) in escrow
 
[C16: from Old French escroe, of Germanic origin; see screed, shred, scroll]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

escrow
1590s, from Anglo-Fr. escrowe, from O.Fr. escroue "scrap, roll of parchment," from a Gmc. source akin to O.H.G. scrot "scrap, shred" (see scroll (n.)). Originally "a deed delivered to a third person until a future condition is satisfied;" sense of "deposit held in trust or security" is from 1888.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
escrow [(es-kroh)]

The condition of being ineffective until certain conditions are met. For example, money inherited by a minor might be held in escrow until the heir reaches a certain age. Homeowners with mortgages frequently pay money for insurance and taxes on their home into an escrow account each month. The holder of the mortgage then pays the insurance and tax bills out of the escrow account when the bills are due.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

escrow definition

security
An arrangement where something (generally money or documents) is held in trust ("in escrow") by a trusted third party until certain agreed conditions are met. In computing the term is used for key escrow and also for source code escrow.
(1999-12-14)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
The two sides eventually agreed to establish an escrow account that could be
  used to repay investors if the case was settled.
They urged university donors to place their gifts in escrow until the perceived
  bias could be corrected.
But the two sides have not bridged the gap on the escrow cutoff.
The board might approve the purchase if the writer deposited money in an escrow
  account to protect the building.
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