ethanolamine

[eth-uh-nol-uh-meen, -noh-luh-, -nuh-lam-in]
noun Chemistry.
a viscous liquid with an odor of ammonia, C 2 H 7 NO, used to remove carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from natural gas, and in the manufacture of antibiotics.
Also called colamine.


Origin:
1895–1900; ethanol + amine

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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
ethanolamine   (ěth'ə-nŏl'ə-mēn', -nō'lə-)  Pronunciation Key 
A colorless liquid used in the purification of petroleum, as a solvent in dry cleaning, and as an ingredient in paints and pharmaceuticals. Chemical formula: C2H7NO.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

ethanolamine

the first of three organic compounds that can be derived from ammonia by successively replacing the hydrogen atoms with hydroxyethyl radicals (CH2CH2OH), the others being diethanolamine and triethanolamine. The three are widely used in industry, principally as absorbents for acidic components (e.g., carbon dioxide) of natural gas and of petroleum-refinery gas streams. As salts (soaps) with fatty acids, they are used as emulsifiers in numerous household and industrial products. Triethanolamine is a corrosion inhibitor for automobile antifreeze solutions and airplane-engine coolants. The ethanolamines are commercially prepared by the reaction of ammonia and ethylene oxide.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Ethanolamine vapor is a skin, eye, and respiratory irritant and has some narcotic properties.
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