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[ih-vikt] /ɪˈvɪkt/
verb (used with object)
to expel (a person, especially a tenant) from land, a building, etc., by legal process, as for nonpayment of rent.
to recover (property, titles, etc.) by virtue of superior legal title.
Origin of evict
late Middle English
1400-50; late Middle English evicten < Late Latin ēvictus having recovered one's property by law, Latin: past participle of ēvincere to overcome, conquer, evince), equivalent to ē- e-1 + vic- (past participle stem of vincere; see victor) + -tus past participle suffix
Related forms
eviction, noun
evictor, noun
noneviction, noun
reevict, verb (used with object)
unevicted, adjective Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for eviction
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He told the story of the eviction and his companion listened as they plodded up the hill.

    Tom Slade Percy K. Fitzhugh
  • "It's not exactly a funeral, but an eviction," remarked Owen again.

  • Driving in the direction of Castlegard, I pass the signs of an eviction which took place at least a fortnight ago.

    Disturbed Ireland Bernard H. Becker
  • It was he who decided who got eviction notices and who could become tenants.

    L'Assommoir Emile Zola
  • eviction, the dispossession of a person from the occupancy of lands or tenements.

British Dictionary definitions for eviction


verb (transitive)
to expel (a tenant) from property by process of law; turn out
to recover (property or the title to property) by judicial process or by virtue of a superior title
Derived Forms
eviction, noun
evictor, noun
evictee, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Late Latin ēvincere, from Latin: to vanquish utterly, from vincere to conquer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for eviction

mid-15c., from Middle French éviction, from Latin evictionem (nominative evictio) "recovery of one's property," noun of action from past participle stem of evincere (see evict).



mid-15c., "recover (property) by judicial means," from Latin evictus, past participle of evincere "recover property, overcome and expel, conquer," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + vincere "conquer" (see victor). Sense of "expel by legal process" first recorded in English 1530s. Related: Evicted; evicting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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