exaggeration

[ig-zaj-uh-rey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of exaggerating or overstating.
2.
an instance of exaggerating; an overstatement: His statement concerning the size of his income is a gross exaggeration.

Origin:
1555–65; < Latin exaggerātiōn- (stem of exaggerātiō), equivalent to exaggerāt(us) (see exaggerate) + -iōn- -ion

nonexaggeration, noun
overexaggeration, noun
self-exaggeration, noun
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World English Dictionary
exaggerate (ɪɡˈzædʒəˌreɪt)
 
vb
1.  to regard or represent as larger or greater, more important or more successful, etc, than is true
2.  (tr) to make greater, more noticeable, etc, than usual: his new clothes exaggerated his awkwardness
 
[C16: from Latin exaggerāre to magnify, from aggerāre to heap, from agger heap]
 
ex'aggeratingly
 
adv
 
exagger'ation
 
n
 
ex'aggerative
 
adj
 
ex'aggeratory
 
adj
 
ex'aggerator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

exaggeration
1560s, from L. exaggerationem, noun of action from exaggerare (see exaggerate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It also represents an exaggeration of the president's military role.
Dean's statement is a combination of exaggeration and wordplay.
It is not an exaggeration to say that it could happen again if governments fail
  to act.
But the number, he adds, was likely an exaggeration.
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