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[ig-zam-in] /ɪgˈzæm ɪn/
verb (used with object), examined, examining.
to inspect or scrutinize carefully:
to examine a prospective purchase.
to observe, test, or investigate (a person's body or any part of it), especially in order to evaluate general health or determine the cause of illness.
to inquire into or investigate:
to examine one's motives.
to test the knowledge, reactions, or qualifications of (a pupil, candidate, etc.), as by questions or assigning tasks.
to subject to legal inquisition; put to question in regard to conduct or to knowledge of facts; interrogate:
to examine a witness; to examine a suspect.
Origin of examine
1275-1325; Middle English < Middle French examiner < Latin exāmināre to weigh, examine, test, equivalent to exāmin- (stem of exāmen examen) + -āre infinitive ending
Related forms
examinable, adjective
[ig-zam-uh-nuh-tawr-ee-uh l, -tohr-] /ɪgˌzæm ə nəˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-/ (Show IPA),
examiner, noun
examiningly, adverb
preexamine, verb (used with object), preexamined, preexamining.
preexaminer, noun
subexaminer, noun
superexaminer, noun
unexaminable, adjective
unexamined, adjective
unexamining, adjective
well-examined, adjective
1. search, probe, explore, study. 3. quiz. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for examining
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He produced a pocket-knife, and walked toward her slowly, examining it with care.

    The Ghost Breaker Charles Goddard
  • It is necessary that these be understood in examining this table.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5 Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences
  • A certain magistrate told somebody whom he was examining in court that he or she "should always be polite to the police."

    All Things Considered G. K. Chesterton
  • He had been examining a glass, a spoon and some other objects so quietly that I had not heard.

    The Bacillus of Beauty Harriet Stark
  • A black-bearded man in a rough overcoat was examining a row of dolls which dangled by their necks from a line above the show case.

    Miss Santa Claus of the Pullman Annie Fellows Johnston
British Dictionary definitions for examining


verb (transitive)
to look at, inspect, or scrutinize carefully or in detail; investigate
(education) to test the knowledge or skill of (a candidate) in (a subject or activity) by written or oral questions or by practical tests
(law) to interrogate (a witness or accused person) formally on oath
(med) to investigate the state of health of (a patient)
Derived Forms
examinable, adjective
examiner, noun
examining, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Old French examiner, from Latin exāmināre to weigh, from exāmen means of weighing; see examen
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for examining



c.1300, from Old French examiner "interrogate, question, torture," from Latin examinare "to test or try; weigh, consider, ponder," from examen "a means of weighing or testing," probably ultimately from exigere "weigh accurately" (see exact). Related: Examined; examining.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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examining in Medicine

examine ex·am·ine (ĭg-zām'ĭn)
v. ex·am·ined, ex·am·in·ing, ex·am·ines

  1. To study or analyze an organic material.

  2. To test or check the condition or health of.

  3. To determine the qualifications, aptitude, or skills of by means of questions or exercises.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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