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excommunication

[eks-kuh-myoo-ni-key-shuh n] /ˌɛks kəˌmyu nɪˈkeɪ ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of excommunicating.
2.
the state of being excommunicated.
3.
the ecclesiastical sentence by which a person is excommunicated.
Origin of excommunication
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English < Late Latin excommūnicātiōn- (stem of excommūnicātiō). See excommunicate, -ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for excommunication
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • They brought the spreading Plague and the excommunication of Savonarola.

    Romola George Eliot
  • He threatened the King with excommunication, and of course that frightened him.

    Earl Hubert's Daughter Emily Sarah Holt
  • This was easily granted; but the Venetians, who seemed to care little about excommunication, remained under the papal censure.

    The History of Chivalry G. P. R. James
  • The Bishop of Beauvais then pronounced her sentence of excommunication.

    The Story of Rouen Sir Theodore Andrea Cook
  • In fact, they were subject to excommunication if they refused to give money when called upon by the inquisitor.

Word Origin and History for excommunication
n.

mid-15c., from Late Latin excommunicationem (nominative excommunicatio), from past participle stem of excommunicare "put out of the community," in Church Latin "to expel from communion," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + communicare, from communis "common" (see common).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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