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exiguous

[ig-zig-yoo-uh s, ik-sig-] /ɪgˈzɪg yu əs, ɪkˈsɪg-/
adjective
1.
scanty; meager; small; slender:
exiguous income.
Origin of exiguous
1645-1655
1645-55; < Latin exiguus scanty in measure or number, small, equivalent to exig(ere) (see exigent) + -uus deverbal adj. suffix
Related forms
exiguity
[ek-si-gyoo-i-tee] /ˌɛk sɪˈgyu ɪ ti/ (Show IPA),
exiguousness, noun
exiguously, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for exiguous
Historical Examples
  • She arrived punctually at eight o'clock next Sunday, carrying an exiguous green linen bag, which contained her dresses.

    Beyond John Galsworthy
  • There are plenty of references to them indeed, but they are exiguous and dull.

  • We got up, had a cheery and exiguous breakfast to distant, intermittent firing, then did a little work on our bicycles.

  • Liosha joined us, accompanied by a porter, carrying their exiguous baggage.

    Jaffery William J. Locke
  • Its two grave-like bunks, its drop table, even its exiguous armchair promised no comfort.

    A Bed of Roses W. L. George
  • Often the Signal Office gives you the most exiguous information.

  • One of us spent all his spare time at this café in silent adoration—of the piano, for his French was exiguous in the extreme.

  • Flora saw her father trembling in all his exiguous length, though he held himself stiffer than ever if that was possible.

    Chance Joseph Conrad
  • If our pecuniary resources be exiguous, let our resolution, Dick, supply the deficiencies of Fortune.

    Burlesques William Makepeace Thackeray
  • Together they had a noble breakfast, with waffles, and coffee not in exiguous cups but in large pots.

    Babbitt Sinclair Lewis
British Dictionary definitions for exiguous

exiguous

/ɪɡˈzɪɡjʊəs; ɪkˈsɪɡ-/
adjective
1.
scanty or slender; meagre: an exiguous income
Derived Forms
exiguity (ˌɛksɪˈɡjuːɪtɪ), exiguousness, noun
exiguously, adverb
Word Origin
C17: from Latin exiguus, from exigere to weigh out; see exigent
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for exiguous
adj.

"scanty," 1650s, from Latin exiguus "small, petty, paltry, scanty in measure or number," from exigere (see exact).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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