follow Dictionary.com

What does Boxing Day have to do with boxing?

extend

[ik-stend] /ɪkˈstɛnd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to stretch out; draw out to the full length:
He extended the measuring tape as far as it would go.
2.
to stretch, draw, or arrange in a given direction, or so as to reach a particular point, as a cord, wall, or line of troops.
3.
to stretch forth or hold out, as the arm or hand:
to extend one's hand in greeting.
4.
to place at full length, especially horizontally, as the body or limbs.
5.
to increase the length or duration of; lengthen; prolong:
to extend a visit.
6.
to stretch out in various or all directions; expand; spread out in area:
A huge tent was extended over the field.
7.
to enlarge the scope of, or make more comprehensive, as operations, influence, or meaning:
The European powers extended their authority in Asia.
8.
to provide as an offer or grant; offer; grant; give:
to extend aid to needy scholars.
9.
Finance. to postpone (the payment of a debt) beyond the time originally agreed upon.
10.
to increase the bulk or volume of, especially by adding an inexpensive or plentiful substance.
11.
Bookkeeping. to transfer (figures) from one column to another.
12.
Law.
  1. British. to assess or value.
  2. to make a seizure or levy upon, as land, by a writ of extent.
13.
Manège. to bring (a horse) into an extended attitude.
14.
to exert (oneself) to an unusual degree.
15.
Archaic. to exaggerate.
16.
Obsolete. to take by seizure.
verb (used without object)
17.
to be or become extended; stretch out in length, duration, or in various or all directions.
18.
to reach, as to a particular point.
19.
to increase in length, area, scope, etc.
20.
Manège. (of a horse) to come into an extended attitude.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English extenden < Latin extendere to stretch out. See ex-1, tend1
Related forms
extendible, extendable, adjective
extendibility, extendability, noun
nonextendible, adjective
nonextendibleness, noun
preextend, verb
superextend, verb
unextendable, adjective
unextendible, adjective
Synonyms
5. continue. See lengthen. 6. enlarge; widen, dilate. 8. bestow, impart.
Antonyms
1. shorten, contract.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for extending
  • When you close the gate, place a stone or two on the extending mesh to secure it.
  • Thanks mainly to keener instruments and more powerful computers, forecasters are extending their reach into the uncertain future.
  • But extending that experience to entire cities is no small endeavor.
  • Imagine a line extending from your head to its shadow on the ground.
  • extending unemployment benefits was also an excellent use of stimulus funds, since that money tends to get spent immediately.
  • Yes, he went along with extending the top-bracket tax cuts.
  • Being good enough to play professional baseball must be fun, and hitting a season-extending home run must be even more fun.
  • extending that burden to journalists could have a chilling effect that is larger than any single leak.
  • extending the proposal stage only makes that road longer and more costly.
  • Five outside evaluators wrote letters praising her scholarship as innovative and field-extending.
British Dictionary definitions for extending

extend

/ɪkˈstɛnd/
verb
1.
to draw out or be drawn out; stretch
2.
to last for a certain time: his schooling extended for three years
3.
(intransitive) to reach a certain point in time or distance: the land extends five miles
4.
(intransitive) to exist or occur: the trees extended throughout the area
5.
(transitive) to increase (a building, etc) in size or area; add to or enlarge
6.
(transitive) to broaden the meaning or scope of: the law was extended
7.
(transitive) to put forth, present, or offer: to extend greetings
8.
to stretch forth (an arm, etc)
9.
(transitive) to lay out (a body) at full length
10.
(transitive) to strain or exert (a person or animal) to the maximum
11.
(transitive) to prolong (the time originally set) for payment of (a debt or loan), completion of (a task), etc
12.
(transitive) (accounting)
  1. to carry forward
  2. to calculate the amount of (a total, balance, etc)
13.
(transitive) (law) (formerly in England) to value or assess (land)
Derived Forms
extendible, extendable, adjective
extendibility, extendability, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Latin extendere to stretch out, from tendere to stretch
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for extending

extend

v.

early 14c., "to value, assess;" late 14c. "to stretch out, lengthen," from Anglo-French estendre (late 13c.), Old French estendre "stretch out, extend, increase," from Latin extendere "stretch out," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + tendere "to stretch" (see tenet). Related: Extended; extending.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
extending in Medicine

extend ex·tend (ĭk-stěnd')
v. ex·tend·ed, ex·tend·ing, ex·tends
To straighten a limb; unbend.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for extend

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for extending

18
21
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with extending