astounding

[uh-stoun-ding]
adjective
capable of overwhelming with amazement; stunningly surprising.

Origin:
1580–90; astound + -ing2

astoundingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged

astound

[uh-stound]
verb (used with object)
1.
to overwhelm with amazement; astonish greatly; shock with wonder or surprise.
adjective
2.
Archaic. astonished; astounded.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English astoun(e)d, past participle of astonen, variant of astonyen to astonish

astoundment, noun


1. See surprise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
astound (əˈstaʊnd)
 
vb
(tr) to overwhelm with amazement and wonder; bewilder
 
[C17: from astoned amazed, from Old French estoné, from estoner to astonish]

astounding (əˈstaʊndɪŋ)
 
adj
causing amazement and wonder; bewildering
 
a'stoundingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

astound
c.1600, from M.E. astouned, astoned (c.1300), pp. of astonien "to stun" (see astonish), with more of the original sense of V.L. *extonare.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Information-gathering about individuals has reached an astounding level of
  completeness, if not actual malevolence.
The cost to the nation in lost time and resources is astounding.
Few things more astounding than electoral democracy have been invented.
The implications, to those of us in the research community, are astounding.
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