exterritoriality

exterritorial

[eks-ter-i-tawr-ee-uhl, -tohr-]
adjective

Origin:
1850–55; ex-1 + territorial

exterritoriality, noun
exterritorially, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged

extraterritoriality

[ek-struh-ter-i-tawr-ee-al-i-tee, -tohr-]
noun
1.
immunity from the jurisdiction of a nation, granted to foreign diplomatic officials, foreign warships, etc.
2.
the applicability or exercise of a sovereign's laws outside its territory.
Also, exterritoriality.


Origin:
1830–40; extra- + territoriality

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To exterritoriality
Collins
World English Dictionary
exterritorial (ˌɛkstɛrɪˈtɔːrɪəl)
 
adj
a variant of extraterritorial
 
exterritori'ality
 
n
 
exterri'torially
 
adv

extraterritoriality (ˌɛkstrəˌtɛrɪˌtɔːrɪˈælɪtɪ)
 
n
1.  the privilege granted to some aliens, esp diplomats, of being exempt from the jurisdiction of the state in which they reside
2.  the right or privilege of a state to exercise authority in certain circumstances beyond the limits of its territory

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

extraterritoriality
1836, from extra- + territory + -al (1) + -ity.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

exterritoriality

in international law, the immunities enjoyed by foreign states or international organizations and their official representatives from the jurisdiction of the country in which they are present. Extraterritoriality extends to foreign states or international organizations as entities and to their heads, legations, troops in passage, war vessels, mission premises, and other assets. It exempts them, while within the territory of a foreign sovereign, from local judicial process, police interference, and other measures of constraint. The term stems from the fiction that such persons or things are deemed not to be within the territory of the sovereign where they are actually present. This doctrine was originated by the French jurist Pierre Ayraut (1536-1601) and gained wide currency because of its adoption by the classical writers on the law of nations such as Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) and Samuel von Pufendorf (1632-1694). The word extraterritoriality or its foreign equivalent was not in use until the end of the 18th century. It gained a place in the legal vocabulary through its use, if not creation, by Georg Friedrich von Martens (1756-1821), whose treatise on the law of nations, published in 1788, acquired international repute and was promptly translated into several languages, including English.

Learn more about exterritoriality with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature