exult

[ig-zuhlt]
verb (used without object)
1.
to show or feel a lively or triumphant joy; rejoice exceedingly; be highly elated or jubilant: They exulted over their victory.
2.
Obsolete. to leap, especially for joy.

Origin:
1560–70; < Latin ex(s)ultāre to leap up, equivalent to ex- ex-1 + -sultāre (combining form of saltāre to leap)

exultingly, adverb
self-exulting, adjective

exalt, exult.


1. delight, glory, revel.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
exult (ɪɡˈzʌlt)
 
vb
1.  to be joyful or jubilant, esp because of triumph or success; rejoice
2.  (often foll by over) to triumph (over); show or take delight in the defeat or discomfiture (of)
 
[C16: from Latin exsultāre to jump or leap for joy, from saltāre to leap]
 
 
exultation
 
n
 
ex'ultingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

exult
to rejoice, triumph, 1590s, from Fr. exulter, from L. exultare/exsultare, freq. of exsilire to leap up, from ex- out + salire to leap (see salient). The notion is of leaping or dancing for joy. Related: Exulted; exulting.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Mystics exult in mystery and want it to stay mysterious.
Canadians are an exciting, dynamic people who exult in their well-defined and
  instantly recognizable national culture.
We have no disposition to exult over this victory, signal and important as it
  is.
She sang about earthly and divine ecstasy, and she sang simply to exult in her
  voice.
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