fader

fader

[fey-der]
noun
1.
a person or thing that fades.
2.
Movies, Broadcasting, Recording. a multiple-unit volume control used in changing gradually from one signal source to another, decreasing the volume from the first audio or visual source while increasing the volume from the second.

Origin:
1930–35; fade + -er1

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
fade (feɪd)
 
vb
1.  to lose or cause to lose brightness, colour, or clarity
2.  (intr) to lose freshness, vigour, or youth; wither
3.  (intr; usually foll by away or out) to vanish slowly; die out
4.  a.  to decrease the brightness or volume of (a television or radio programme or film sequence) or (of a television programme, etc) to decrease in this way
 b.  to decrease the volume of (a sound) in a recording system or (of a sound) to be so reduced in volume
5.  (intr) (of the brakes of a vehicle) to lose power
6.  to cause (a golf ball) to move with a controlled left-to-right trajectory or (of a golf ball) to veer gradually from left to right
 
n
7.  the act or an instance of fading
 
[C14: from fade (adj) dull, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin fatidus (unattested), probably blend of Latin vapidusvapid + Latin fatuusfatuous]
 
'fadable
 
adj
 
'fadedness
 
n
 
'fader
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

fader
sound control device, 1931, agent noun from fade.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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