falsity

[fawl-si-tee]
noun, plural falsities.
1.
the quality or condition of being false; incorrectness; untruthfulness; treachery.
2.
something false; falsehood.

Origin:
1225–75; Middle English falsete < Anglo-French < Late Latin falsitās. See false, -ity

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World English Dictionary
falsity (ˈfɔːlsɪtɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
1.  the state of being false or untrue
2.  something false; a lie or deception

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

falsity
1550s, from O.Fr. falsité (Mod.Fr. fausseté), from L. falsitas, from falsus (see false).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It is not trying to comment on the truth of falsity of the positions that
  people try to support by means of the fallacy.
It happens to be false, and its falsity is pretty much manifest as soon as it
  is stated plainly.
The idea that online course delivery has low overhead is a falsity on many
  levels.
The falsity of intelligent design is established by the existence of those who
  can believe in it.
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