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famish

[fam-ish] /ˈfæm ɪʃ/
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), Archaic.
1.
to suffer or cause to suffer extreme hunger; starve.
2.
to starve to death.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English famisshe, equivalent to famen to starve (< Anglo-French, Middle French afamer < Vulgar Latin *affamāre, equivalent to Latin af- af- + famāre, derivative of famēs hunger) + -isshe -ish2
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for famish
  • AH the time the waiters are to famish all sorts of songs and dances.
British Dictionary definitions for famish

famish

/ˈfæmɪʃ/
verb
1.
(now usually passive) to be or make very hungry or weak
2.
(archaic) to die or cause to die from starvation
3.
(Irish) to make very cold: I was famished with the cold
Derived Forms
famishment, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French afamer, via Vulgar Latin, from Latin famēsfamine
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for famish
v.

c.1400, famyschen, alteration of famen (late 14c.), a shortening of Old French afamer, from Vulgar Latin *affamare "to bring to hunger," from ad famem, from Latin fames "hunger" (see famine).

Ending changed mid-14c. to -ish under influence of ravish, anguish, etc. The intransitive sense is from 1520s. Related: Famished; famishing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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14
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