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Faraday

[far-uh-dee, -dey] /ˈfær ə di, -ˌdeɪ/
noun
1.
Michael, 1791–1867, English physicist and chemist: discoverer of electromagnetic induction.
2.
a unit of electricity used in electrolysis, equal to 96,500 coulombs.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for Faraday
  • Therefore the reflected light is extracted by means of a Faraday rotator and a polarizer.
British Dictionary definitions for Faraday

faraday

/ˈfærəˌdeɪ/
noun
1.
a quantity of electricity, used in electrochemical calculations, equivalent to unit amount of substance of electrons. It is equal to the product of the Avogadro number and the charge on the electron and has the value 96 487 coulombs per mole F
Word Origin
C20: named after Michael Faraday

Faraday

/ˈfærəˌdeɪ/
noun
1.
Michael. 1791–1867, English physicist and chemist who discovered electromagnetic induction, leading to the invention of the dynamo. He also carried out research into the principles of electrolysis
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Faraday in Medicine

faraday far·a·day (fār'ə-dā')
n.
The electric charge required to deposit or liberate 1 gram equivalent weight of a substance in electrolysis, approximately 9.6494 × 104 coulombs.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Faraday in Science
faraday
  (fār'ə-dā')   
A measure of electric charge equal to the charge carried by one mole of electrons, about 96,494 coulombs per mole. The faraday is used in measurements of the electricity required to break down a compound by electrolysis.
Faraday
  (fār'ə-dā', -dē)   
British physicist and chemist whose experiments into the connections between electricity, magnetism, and light laid the foundation for modern physics. In addition to discovering electromagnetic induction, he invented the electric motor, generator, and transformer, and he discovered the carbon compound benzene.

Our Living Language  : The nineteenth century saw rapid growth in the understanding of electricity and magnetism, and much of this progress was due to Michael Faraday. There was no hint from his humble beginnings that he was to become a great scientist. Born in 1791, the son of an English blacksmith, Faraday received little formal schooling. At 14 he was apprenticed to a bookbinder, and it was during this time that he developed an interest in science. In 1812 he attended a series of lectures by Humphry Davy, the well-known chemist. Later in the year, Faraday sent Davy his notes on the talks, asking to become his assistant. When an opening became available, Davy took him on. Faraday, a truly gifted experimenter, started amassing an impressive body of work, converting electrical into mechanical energy (1821), liquefying chlorine (1823), and isolating benzene (1825). He made perhaps his greatest discovery—electromagnetic induction—in 1831, when he produced electricity from magnetism by moving a magnet inside a wire coil. Faraday also came up with the concept of electric and magnetic fields. When James Clerk Maxwell put Faraday's ideas into mathematical form (Faraday knew little mathematics), they became a cornerstone of physics. It was Faraday's research that helped transform electricity from a scientific curiosity into a workable technology. But he also transformed the language, helping to coin the words anode, cathode, ion, and electrode, among others. It is only fitting that there are now two words named after him: farad, the unit of capacitance, and faraday, a unit used to measure the amount of electrical charge.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for Faraday

faraday constant

unit of electricity, used in the study of electrochemical reactions and equal to the amount of electric charge that liberates one gram equivalent of any ion from an electrolytic solution. It was named in honour of the 19th-century English scientist Michael Faraday and equals 9.6485309 104 coulombs, or 6.0221367 1023 electrons (see also Avogadro's law).

Learn more about faraday constant with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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