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feat1

[feet] /fit/
noun
1.
a noteworthy or extraordinary act or achievement, usually displaying boldness, skill, etc.:
Arranging the treaty was a diplomatic feat.
2.
Obsolete. a specialized skill; profession.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English fet, fait < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin factum fact
Synonyms
1. accomplishment. See achievement.

feat2

[feet] /fit/
adjective, feater, featest. Archaic.
1.
apt; skillful; dexterous.
2.
3.
neat.
Origin
1400-50; late Middle English < Middle French fait made (to fit) < Latin factus, past participle of facere to make, do
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for feat
  • It would become an achievement that even the uninitiated can recognize as an impressive feat of engineering.
  • Finding time to steal away to the shed is no easy feat.
  • There is no way to accomplish that feat in a restaurant setting, however upscale.
  • It's an arduous and admirable feat that requires a huge amount of discipline and drive.
  • The cells could form three-dimensional structures, a feat rarely achieved with stem cells.
  • But how they manage this feat has puzzled scientists for decades.
  • With a simple headband recording system, the device represents a neat feat of engineering.
  • So using crowdsourced astronomy to repeat it now would something of a feat.
  • The whole work is a feat of resourceful painterly artifice.
  • The true feat is the tremendous exertion required to return to the surface.
British Dictionary definitions for feat

feat1

/fiːt/
noun
1.
a remarkable, skilful, or daring action; exploit; achievement: feats of strength
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-French fait, from Latin factum deed; see fact

feat2

/fiːt/
adjective (archaic)
1.
another word for skilful
2.
another word for neat1 , suitable
Word Origin
C14: from Old French fet, from Latin factus made, from facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for feat
n.

mid-14c., "action, deeds," from Anglo-French fet, from Old French fait (12c.) "action, deed, achievement," from Latin factum "thing done," a noun based on the past participle of facere "make, do" (see factitious). Sense of "exceptional or noble deed" arose c.1400 from phrase feat of arms (French fait d'armes).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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7
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