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feature

[fee-cher] /ˈfi tʃər/
noun
1.
a prominent or conspicuous part or characteristic:
Tall buildings were a new feature on the skyline.
2.
something offered as a special attraction:
This model has several added features.
3.
Also called feature film. the main motion picture in a movie program:
What time is the feature?
4.
any part of the face, as the nose, chin, or eyes:
prominent features.
5.
features, the face; countenance:
to compose one's features for the photographers.
6.
the form or cast of the face:
delicate of feature.
7.
a column, cartoon, etc., appearing regularly in a newspaper or magazine.
9.
Archaic. make, form, or shape.
verb (used with object), featured, featuring.
10.
to be a feature or distinctive mark of:
It was industrial expansion that featured the last century.
11.
to make a feature of; give prominence to:
to feature a story or picture in a newspaper.
12.
to delineate the main characteristics of; depict; outline.
13.
Informal. to conceive of; imagine; fancy:
He couldn't quite feature himself as a bank president.
14.
Older Use. to resemble in features; favor.
verb (used without object), featured, featuring.
15.
to play a major part.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; 1905-10 for def 3; Middle English feture < Anglo-French, Middle French faiture < Latin factūra a making. See fact, -ure
Related forms
transfeature, verb (used with object), transfeatured, transfeaturing.
underfeature, noun
Synonyms
1. Feature, characteristic, peculiarity refer to a distinctive trait of an individual or of a class. Feature suggests an outstanding or marked property that attracts attention: Complete harmony was a feature of the convention. Characteristic means a distinguishing mark or quality (or one of such) always associated in one's mind with a particular person or thing: Defiance is one of his characteristics. Peculiarity means that distinct or unusual characteristic that marks off an individual in the class to which he, she, or it belongs: A blue-black tongue is a peculiarity of the chow chow.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for feature
  • The feature of the wedding breakfast is always the bride's table.
  • Her hair was blacker than a raven, and every feature of her face in perfection.
  • Considering its natural sweetness, it's surprising that corn doesn't feature in more desserts.
  • And yet for over a hundred years, feature films have played with science's facts and distorted its principles and theories.
  • Both museums feature works by artists who never became household names.
  • Most sting-treatment products feature vinegar, the best remedy for jelly venom.
  • The accidental discovery revealed that chickens retain the ability to grow teeth, even though birds lost this feature long ago.
  • In every direction the dominant feature of the landscape, the element that binds everything together, is water.
  • While the device paved the way for wireless remotes, it had one problematic feature: the cells would react to any beam of light.
  • Salt pigs feature a wide mouth for easy access and ensure your salt is dust- and stray-food free.
British Dictionary definitions for feature

feature

/ˈfiːtʃə/
noun
1.
any one of the parts of the face, such as the nose, chin, or mouth
2.
a prominent or distinctive part or aspect, as of a landscape, building, book, etc
3.
the principal film in a programme at a cinema
4.
an item or article appearing regularly in a newspaper, magazine, etc a gardening feature
5.
Also called feature story. a prominent story in a newspaper, etc a feature on prison reform
6.
a programme given special prominence on radio or television as indicated by attendant publicity
7.
an article offered for sale as a special attraction, as in a large retail establishment
8.
(archaic) general form or make-up
9.
(linguistics) a quality of a linguistic unit at some level of description grammatical feature, semantic feature
verb
10.
(transitive) to have as a feature or make a feature of
11.
to give prominence to (an actor, famous event, etc) in a film or (of an actor, etc) to have prominence in a film
12.
(transitive) (US, informal) to imagine; consider I can't feature that happening
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-French feture, from Latin factūra a making, from facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for feature
n.

early 14c., "make, form, fashion," from Anglo-French feture, from Old French faiture "deed, action; fashion, shape, form; countenance," from Latin factura "a formation, a working," from past participle stem of facere "make, do, perform" (see factitious). Sense of "facial characteristic" is mid-14c.; that of "any distinctive part" first recorded 1690s. Entertainment sense is from 1801; in journalism by 1855. Meaning "a feature film" is from 1913.

v.

1755, "to resemble," from feature (n.). The sense of "make special display or attraction of" is 1888; entertainment sense from 1897. Related: Featured; featuring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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feature in Technology

jargon
1. A good property or behaviour (as of a program). Whether it was intended or not is immaterial.
2. An intended property or behaviour (as of a program). Whether it is good or not is immaterial (but if bad, it is also a misfeature).
3. A surprising property or behaviour; in particular, one that is purposely inconsistent because it works better that way - such an inconsistency is therefore a feature and not a bug. This kind of feature is sometimes called a miswart.
4. A property or behaviour that is gratuitous or unnecessary, though perhaps also impressive or cute. For example, one feature of Common LISP's "format" function is the ability to print numbers in two different Roman-numeral formats (see bells, whistles, and gongs).
5. A property or behaviour that was put in to help someone else but that happens to be in your way.
6. A bug that has been documented. To call something a feature sometimes means the author of the program did not consider the particular case, and that the program responded in a way that was unexpected but not strictly incorrect. A standard joke is that a bug can be turned into a feature simply by documenting it (then theoretically no one can complain about it because it's in the manual), or even by simply declaring it to be good. "That's not a bug, that's a feature!" is a common catch-phrase. Apparently there is a Volkswagen Beetle in San Francisco whose license plate reads "FEATURE".
See also feetch feetch, creeping featurism, wart, green lightning.
The relationship among bugs, features, misfeatures, warts and miswarts might be clarified by the following hypothetical exchange between two hackers on an airliner:
A: "This seat doesn't recline."
B: "That's not a bug, that's a feature. There is an emergency exit door built around the window behind you, and the route has to be kept clear."
A: "Oh. Then it's a misfeature; they should have increased the spacing between rows here."
B: "Yes. But if they'd increased spacing in only one section it would have been a wart - they would've had to make nonstandard-length ceiling panels to fit over the displaced seats."
A: "A miswart, actually. If they increased spacing throughout they'd lose several rows and a chunk out of the profit margin. So unequal spacing would actually be the Right Thing."
B: "Indeed."
"Undocumented feature" is a common euphemism for a bug.
7. An attribute or function of a class in Eiffel.
[Jargon File]
(1995-10-22)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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