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feckless

[fek-lis] /ˈfɛk lɪs/
adjective
1.
ineffective; incompetent; futile:
feckless attempts to repair the plumbing.
2.
having no sense of responsibility; indifferent; lazy.
Origin
1590-1600
1590-1600; orig. Scots, equivalent to feck, late Middle English (Scots) fek, aphetic form of effeck (Scots form of effect) + -less
Related forms
fecklessly, adverb
fecklessness, noun
Can be confused
feckless, reckless.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for feckless
  • And now he is playing the doddering, out-of-touch old fool who was betrayed by his feckless employees.
  • The less active it was, the more feckless people were.
  • Career politicians, by definition, are feckless partisan hacks.
  • It is about whether the populace may know about the actions and crimes of their feckless politicians.
  • NO self respecting country wants it's children harvested by the citizens of a feckless superpower.
  • Care must be taken so mothers rather than feckless fathers control funds for their children.
  • Bad enough that the feckless guardians of the nation's wealth should squander the funds-worse that they wasted it on themselves.
  • The widespread poverty,unemployment,drug addiction and feckless begging on the main streets was shocking.
  • Too often such work degenerates into a feckless exercise.
  • While reprehensible and feckless, these tactics are not surprising to us.
British Dictionary definitions for feckless

feckless

/ˈfɛklɪs/
adjective
1.
feeble; weak; ineffectual; irresponsible
Derived Forms
fecklessly, adverb
fecklessness, noun
Word Origin
C16: from obsolete feck value, effect + -less
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for feckless
adj.

1590s, from feck, "effect, value, vigor" (late 15c.), Scottish shortened form of effect, + -less. Popularized by Carlyle, who left its opposite, feckful, in dialectal obscurity. Related: Fecklessly; fecklessness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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