fervid

[fur-vid]
adjective
1.
heated or vehement in spirit, enthusiasm, etc.: a fervid orator.
2.
burning; glowing; intensely hot.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Latin fervidus boiling. See fervent, -id4

fervidity, noun
fervidly, adverb
nonfervid, adjective
nonfervidly, adverb
nonfervidness, noun
unfervid, adjective
unfervidly, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
fervent or fervid (ˈfɜːvənt, ˈfɜːvɪd)
 
adj
1.  intensely passionate; ardent: a fervent desire to change society
2.  archaic, poetic or boiling, burning, or glowing: fervent heat
 
[C14: from Latin fervēre to boil, glow]
 
fervid or fervid
 
adj
 
[C14: from Latin fervēre to boil, glow]
 
'fervently or fervid
 
adv
 
'fervidly or fervid
 
adv
 
'ferventness or fervid
 
n
 
'fervidness or fervid
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fervid
1590s, from L. fervidus "glowing, burning, vehement," from fervere "to boil, glow" (see brew). Figurative sense of "impassioned" is from 1650s. Related: Fervidly.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The fervid pace of restaurant openings over the last five years has finally
  peaked, say restaurateurs.
The web rewards, with links and traffic, fervid expressions of ideological
  purity.
The service is snappy and efficient under fervid conditions.
The book revealed a fervid self-taught mind, a literary sensibility and a deep
  paranoia.
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