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fetch1

[fech] /fɛtʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to go and bring back; return with; get:
to go up a hill to fetch a pail of water.
2.
to cause to come; bring:
to fetch a doctor.
3.
to sell for or bring (a price, financial return, etc.):
The horse fetched $50 more than it cost.
4.
Informal. to charm; captivate:
Her beauty fetched the coldest hearts.
5.
to take (a breath).
6.
to utter (a sigh, groan, etc.).
7.
to deal or deliver (a stroke, blow, etc.).
8.
to perform or execute (a movement, step, leap, etc.).
9.
Chiefly Nautical and British Dialect. to reach; arrive at:
to fetch port.
10.
Hunting. (of a dog) to retrieve (game).
verb (used without object)
11.
to go and bring things.
12.
Chiefly Nautical. to move or maneuver.
13.
Hunting. to retrieve game (often used as a command to a dog).
14.
to go by an indirect route; circle (often followed by around or about):
We fetched around through the outer suburbs.
noun
15.
the act of fetching.
16.
the distance of fetching:
a long fetch.
17.
Oceanography.
  1. an area where ocean waves are being generated by the wind.
  2. the length of such an area.
18.
the reach or stretch of a thing.
19.
a trick; dodge.
Verb phrases
20.
fetch about, Nautical. (of a sailing vessel) to come onto a new tack.
21.
fetch up,
  1. Informal. to arrive or stop.
  2. Older Use. to raise (children); bring up:
    She had to fetch up her younger sisters.
  3. Nautical. (of a vessel) to come to a halt, as by lowering an anchor or running aground; bring up.
Idioms
22.
fetch and carry, to perform menial tasks.
Origin
British dialect
1000
before 1000; Middle English fecchen, Old English fecc(e)an, variant of fetian to fetch (compare Middle English feten, fetten, British dialect fet; akin to Old English -fat in sīthfat journey, German fassen to grasp)
Related forms
fetcher, noun
Synonyms
1. See bring.

fetch2

[fech] /fɛtʃ/
noun
1.
wraith (def 1).
Origin
1780-90; perhaps short for fetch-life one sent to fetch the soul of a dying person
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for fetch
  • One day she wanted to go into the forest and fetch some food.
  • There are good reasons why avocados fetch premium prices.
  • So, you run out of your favorite natural peanut butter and fetch that jar from the pantry that you bought last month.
  • The father sent one of the boys in haste to the spring to fetch water for the baptism.
  • Today her works fetch astronomical prices at auction.
  • Today some of his canvases can fetch a million dollars.
  • Experts say the stone is of top-quality color and clarity and could fetch tens of millions of dollars.
  • Fighting his way to a nearby stream to fetch water, he was cut down.
  • If supply gets even more stretched, oil could fetch a far higher price in some parts of the world than others.
  • But many items fetch four figures, so the bankroll can evaporate quickly.
British Dictionary definitions for fetch

fetch1

/fɛtʃ/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
to go after and bring back; get: to fetch help
2.
to cause to come; bring or draw forth: the noise fetched him from the cellar
3.
(also intransitive) to cost or sell for (a certain price): the table fetched six hundred pounds
4.
to utter (a sigh, groan, etc)
5.
(informal) to deal (a blow, slap, etc)
6.
(also intransitive) (nautical) to arrive at or proceed by sailing
7.
(informal) to attract: to be fetched by an idea
8.
(used esp as a command to dogs) to retrieve (shot game, an object thrown, etc)
9.
(rare) to draw in (a breath, gasp, etc), esp with difficulty
10.
fetch and carry, to perform menial tasks or run errands
noun
11.
the reach, stretch, etc, of a mechanism
12.
a trick or stratagem
13.
the distance in the direction of the prevailing wind that air or water can travel continuously without obstruction
Word Origin
Old English feccan; related to Old Norse feta to step, Old High German sih fazzōn to climb

fetch2

/fɛtʃ/
noun
1.
the ghost or apparition of a living person
Word Origin
C18: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for fetch
v.

Old English feccan, apparently a variant of fetian, fatian "to fetch, bring near, obtain; induce; to marry," probably from Proto-Germanic *fatojanan (cf. Old Frisian fatia "to grasp, seize, contain," Old Norse feta "to find one's way," Middle Dutch vatten, Old High German sih faggon "to mount, climb," German fassen "to grasp, contain"). Variant form fet, a derivation of the older Old English version of the word, survived as a competitor until 17c. Related: Fetched; fetching.

n.

"apparition, specter, a double," 1787, of unknown origin (see OED for discussion).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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fetch in Technology

A Macintosh program by Jim Matthews for transferring files using File Transfer Protocol (FTP). Fetch requires a Mac 512KE, System 4.1, and either KSP 1.03 or MacTCP.
Latest version: 2.1.2.
Fetch is Copyright 1992, Trustees of Dartmouth College.
(ftp://ftp.Dartmouth.edu/pub/mac/Fetch_2.1.2.sit.hqx). (ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/computing/systems/mac/info-mac/comm/tcp).
(1994-11-30)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Article for fetch

area of ocean or lake surface over which the wind blows in an essentially constant direction, thus generating waves. The term also is used as a synonym for fetch length, which is the horizontal distance over which wave-generating winds blow. In an enclosed body of water, fetch is also defined as the distance between the points of minimum and maximum water-surface elevation. This line generally coincides with the longest axis in the general wind direction. Fetch is an important factor in the development of wind waves, which increase in height with increasing fetch up to a maximum of 1,600 km (1,000 miles). Wave heights do not increase with increasing fetch beyond this distance

Learn more about fetch with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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