fiercest

fierce

[feers]
adjective, fiercer, fiercest.
1.
menacingly wild, savage, or hostile: fierce animals; a fierce look.
2.
violent in force, intensity, etc.: fierce winds.
3.
furiously eager or intense: fierce competition.
4.
Informal. extremely bad or severe: a fierce cold.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English fiers < Anglo-French fers, Old French fiers (nominative) < Latin ferus wild, fierce; cf. feral1, ferocious

fiercely, adverb
fierceness, noun
overfierce, adjective
overfiercely, adverb
overfierceness, noun
unfierce, adjective
unfiercely, adjective


1. untamed; cruel, fell, brutal; barbarous, bloodthirsty, murderous. Fierce, ferocious, truculent suggest vehemence and violence of temper, manner, or action: fierce in repelling a foe. Ferocious implies fierceness or cruelty, especially of a bloodthirsty kind, in disposition or action: a ferocious glare; ferocious brutality toward helpless refugees. Truculent suggests an intimidating or bullying fierceness of manner or conduct: His truculent attitude kept them terrified and submissive. 2, 3. furious, passionate, turbulent.


1. tame, mild.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
fierce (fɪəs)
 
adj
1.  having a violent and unrestrained nature; savage: a fierce dog
2.  wild or turbulent in force, action, or intensity: a fierce storm
3.  vehement, intense, or strong: fierce competition
4.  informal very disagreeable or unpleasant
 
[C13: from Old French fiers, from Latin ferus]
 
'fiercely
 
adv
 
'fierceness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fierce
mid-13c., from O.Fr. fers, nom. form of fer, fier "wild, ferocious," from L. ferus "wild, untamed," from PIE base *gwer- "wild, wild animal" (cf. Gk. ther, O.C.S. zveri, Lith. zveris "wild beast"). Originally in English also with a sense of "brave, proud," which died out 16c., but caused the word at
first to be commonly used as an epithet, which accounts for the rare instance of a French word entering English in the nominative case. Related: Fiercely; fierceness.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

fierce definition


  1. mod.
    really good. : This is some fierce coffee!
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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