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firewood

[fahyuh r-woo d] /ˈfaɪərˌwʊd/
noun
1.
wood suitable for fuel.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English ferwode. See fire, wood1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for firewood
  • Also, local farmers and ranchers clear cloud forest to expand their operations and harvest firewood.
  • But in the developing world, where firewood is scarce, peasants burn those cornstalks for cooking fuel.
  • One of them, on going to secure it for firewood, found it was an old trunk heavily corded.
  • There were no camels now, only a few sad donkeys hauling firewood.
  • We borrowed an ax from one family, traded hiking tips with another, and shared maps and firewood.
  • If you're comfortable chopping your own firewood or kindling, your small camp ax or hatchet is perfect for splitting a pumpkin.
  • You're likely to see the same color if you split much alder firewood, which is cream or reddish inside.
  • firewood is worth sixty dollars a cord, and twice that in winter.
  • Occasionally it would pounce on a piece of bark that had fallen off the firewood, or a shadow.
  • Plastic has the added benefit that it isn't good for burning, it stinks, so barbarians won't be using it for firewood much.
Word Origin and History for firewood
n.

late 14c., from fire (n.) + wood (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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15
15
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