flagellation

flagellation

[flaj-uh-ley-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act or process of flagellating.
2.
a masochistic or sadistic act in which the participants receive erotic stimulation from whipping or being whipped.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin flagellātiōn-, stem of flagellātiō. See flagellate, -ion

self-flagellation, noun
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World English Dictionary
flagellate
 
vb
1.  (tr) to whip; scourge; flog
 
adj
2.  possessing one or more flagella
3.  resembling a flagellum; whiplike
 
n
4.  a flagellate organism, esp any protozoan of the phylum Zoomastigina
 
flagel'lation
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

flagellation
early 15c., from L. flagellationem (nom. flagellatio) "a scourging," from flagellare, from flagellum "whip," dim. of flagrum "whip, scourge."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

flagellation flag·el·la·tion (flāj'ə-lā'shən)
n.

  1. Whipping oneself or another as a means of arousing or heightening sexual feeling.

  2. The flagellar arrangement on an organism.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

flagellation

in religion, the disciplinary or devotional practice of beating with whips. Although it has been understood in many ways-as a driving out of evil spirits, as purification, as a form of sadism, and as an incorporation of the animal power residing in the whip-none of these characterizations encompasses the whole range of the custom. In antiquity and among prehistoric cultures, ceremonial whippings were performed in rites of initiation, purification, and fertility, which often included other forms of physical suffering. Floggings and mutilations were sometimes self-inflicted. Beatings inflicted by masked impersonators of gods or ancestors figured in many Native American initiations. In the ancient Mediterranean, ritual floggings were practiced by the Spartans, and Roman heretics were whipped with thongs of oxtail, leather, or parchment strips, some being weighted with lead

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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