flit

[flit]
verb (used without object), flitted, flitting.
1.
to move lightly and swiftly; fly, dart, or skim along: bees flitting from flower to flower.
2.
to flutter, as a bird.
3.
to pass quickly, as time: hours flitting by.
4.
Chiefly Scot. and North England.
a.
to depart or die.
b.
to change one's residence.
verb (used with object), flitted, flitting.
5.
Chiefly Scot. to remove; transfer; oust or dispossess.
noun
6.
a light, swift movement; flutter.
7.
Scot. and North England. a change of residence; instance of moving to a new address.
8.
Slang: Disparaging and Offensive. a male homosexual.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English flitten < Old Norse flytja to carry, convey, Swedish flytta. See fleet2

flittingly, adverb


1. See fly1.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
flit (flɪt)
 
vb , flits, flitting, flitted
1.  to move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
2.  to fly rapidly and lightly; flutter
3.  to pass quickly; fleet: a memory flitted into his mind
4.  dialect (Scot), (Northern English) to move house
5.  informal (Brit) to depart hurriedly and stealthily in order to avoid obligations
6.  an informal word for elope
 
n
7.  the act or an instance of flitting
8.  slang chiefly (US) a male homosexual
9.  informal (Brit) a hurried and stealthy departure in order to avoid obligations (esp in the phrase do a flit)
10.  See moonlight flit
 
[C12: from Old Norse flytja to carry]
 
'flitter
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

flit
c.1200, flutten "convey, move, take," perhaps from O.N. flytja "cause to fit," from P.Gmc. *flotojan (see float).
"Theire desire ... is to goe to theire newe masters eyther on a Tewsday, or on a Thursday; for ... they say Munday flitte, Neaver sitte." [1641]
Related: Flitted; flitting.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
More elusive forms, dubbed sprites and blue jets, flit above the clouds.
Space-time is the stage upon which the actors, particles such as photons and gravitons, flit to and fro.
So there is no need for them to flit about in flying saucers.
Around you spreads rain forest, where toucans and iridescent butterflies flit
  from tree to tree.
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