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flit

[flit] /flɪt/
verb (used without object), flitted, flitting.
1.
to move lightly and swiftly; fly, dart, or skim along:
bees flitting from flower to flower.
2.
to flutter, as a bird.
3.
to pass quickly, as time:
hours flitting by.
4.
Chiefly Scot. and North England.
  1. to depart or die.
  2. to change one's residence.
verb (used with object), flitted, flitting.
5.
Chiefly Scot. to remove; transfer; oust or dispossess.
noun
6.
a light, swift movement; flutter.
7.
Scot. and North England. a change of residence; instance of moving to a new address.
8.
Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive. a contemptuous term used to refer to a male homosexual.
Origin
1150-1200
1150-1200; Middle English flitten < Old Norse flytja to carry, convey, Swedish flytta. See fleet2
Related forms
flittingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. See fly1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for flit
  • More elusive forms, dubbed sprites and blue jets, flit above the clouds.
  • So there is no need for them to flit about in flying saucers.
  • Around you spreads rain forest, where toucans and iridescent butterflies flit from tree to tree.
  • At night bats flit through the gaps at the top of the wall, do hairpin turns in the air, and exit again without slowing.
  • Footmen in grey waistcoats and dark jackets flit through the tall, wood-paneled corridors.
  • They flit away and reproduce themselves, evolve and are translated into foreign languages.
  • Usually, a driver's eyes flit about, wandering from road to mirror to traffic and back.
  • Sparrows are cheeping all around as they flit among the red and gold leaves of trees in full autumn display.
  • Every day, birds flit through our world but only occasionally do they make themselves known to us in intimate ways.
  • Space-time is the stage upon which the actors, particles such as photons and gravitons, flit to and fro.
British Dictionary definitions for flit

flit

/flɪt/
verb (intransitive) flits, flitting, flitted
1.
to move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
2.
to fly rapidly and lightly; flutter
3.
to pass quickly; fleet: a memory flitted into his mind
4.
(Scot & Northern English, dialect) to move house
5.
(Brit, informal) to depart hurriedly and stealthily in order to avoid obligations
6.
an informal word for elope
noun
7.
the act or an instance of flitting
8.
(slang, mainly US) a male homosexual
9.
(Brit, informal) a hurried and stealthy departure in order to avoid obligations (esp in the phrase do a flit)
10.
Derived Forms
flitter, noun
Word Origin
C12: from Old Norse flytja to carry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for flit
v.

c.1200, flutten "convey, move, take, carry away, go away," perhaps from Old Norse flytja "to remove, bring."

Theire desire ... is to goe to theire newe masters eyther on a Tewsday, or on a Thursday; for ... they say Munday flitte, Neaver sitte. [Henry Best, farming & account book, 1641]
Related: Flitted; flitting. As a noun, from 1835.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for flit

flit

noun

A male homosexual; effeminate man (1940s+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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