flitch

flitch

[flich]
noun
1.
the side of a hog (or, formerly, some other animal) salted and cured: a flitch of bacon.
2.
a steak cut from a halibut.
3.
Carpentry.
a.
a piece, as a board, forming part of a flitch beam.
b.
a thin piece of wood, as a veneer.
c.
a bundle of veneers, arranged as cut from the log.
d.
a log about to be cut into veneers.
e.
cant2 ( def 8 ).
verb (used with object)
4.
to cut into flitches.
5.
Carpentry. to assemble (boards or the like) into a laminated construction.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English flicche, Old English flicca; cognate with Middle Low German vlicke, Old Norse flikki

unflitched, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
flitch (flɪtʃ)
 
n
1.  a side of pork salted and cured
2.  a steak cut from the side of certain fishes, esp halibut
3.  a piece of timber cut lengthways from a tree trunk, esp one that is larger than 4 by 12 inches
 
vb
4.  (tr) to cut (a tree trunk) into flitches
 
[Old English flicce; related to Old Norse flikki, Middle Low German vlicke, Norwegian flika; see flesh]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

flitch
"side of bacon," M.E. flicche, from O.E. flicce, related to O.N. flikki, M.L.G. vlicke "piece of flesh." Not connected to flesh. A flitch was presented every year at Dunmow, in Essex, to any married couple who could prove they had lived together without quarreling for a year and a day, a custom mentioned
as far back as mid-14c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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