fluorosis

fluorosis

[floo-roh-sis, flaw-, floh-]
noun Pathology.
1.
an abnormal condition caused by excessive intake of fluorides, characterized in children by discoloration and pitting of the teeth and in adults by pathological bone changes.
2.
Also called mottled enamel. Dentistry. the changes in tooth enamel symptomatic of fluorosis.

Origin:
1925–30; fluor- + -osis

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World English Dictionary
fluorosis (flʊəˈrəʊsɪs)
 
n
fluoride poisoning, due to ingestion of too much fluoride in drinking water over a long period or to ingestion of pesticides containing fluoride salts. Chronic fluorosis results in mottling of the teeth of children

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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

fluorosis fluo·ro·sis (flu-rō'sĭs, flô-)
n.
An abnormal condition caused by excessive intake of fluorine, as from fluoridated drinking water, characterized chiefly by mottling of the teeth.


fluo·rot'ic (-rŏt'ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

fluorosis

chronic intoxication with fluorine (usually combined with some other element to form a fluoride) that results in changes in the skeleton and ossification of tendons and ligaments. Exposure to fluoride in optimum amounts (about one part per million of fluoride to water) is claimed to be beneficial to the teeth (in the prevention of caries) and probably to bone development; fluorides ingested in very high amounts over a short period are general poisons that produce quick death. Mild chronic exposure (6-8 parts per million of water) will cause mottling of tooth enamel in children, but the bones are unaffected. In more severe chronic exposure, bone calcium is gradually replaced by fluorine; the bones become soft and crumbly and turn chalky white. Protrusions of new bone develop in abnormal places. There are few early symptoms, but late developments include stiffness, inability to move the spine, and neurologic symptoms when nerves of the spinal cord are compressed

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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