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forego1

[fawr-goh, fohr-] /fɔrˈgoʊ, foʊr-/
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), forewent, foregone, foregoing.
1.
to go before; precede.
Origin of forego1
900
before 900; Middle English forgon, forgan, Old English foregān. See fore-, go1
Related forms
foregoer, noun

forego2

[fawr-goh, fohr-] /fɔrˈgoʊ, foʊr-/
verb (used with object), forewent, foregone, foregoing.
1.
Related forms
foregoer, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for forego
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Thinkest thou I could forego the joy of seeing thy proud head laid low?

    Comic Tragedies Louisa M. Alcott
  • No one can honestly promise to forego the right which he has over all things.

  • A fourth time she returned, consenting to forego all thoughts of vengeance if the king would order the young hero to marry her.

  • And hark you, Calderon, I tell you that I will not forego this pursuit.

    Calderon The Courtier Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • "I feel quite willing to forego the honor of such an introduction," coolly returned the daughter.

    The Rangers D. P. Thompson
British Dictionary definitions for forego

forego1

/fɔːˈɡəʊ/
verb -goes, -going, -went, -gone
1.
to precede in time, place, etc
Derived Forms
foregoer, noun
Word Origin
Old English foregān

forego2

/fɔːˈɡəʊ/
verb -goes, -going, -went, -gone
1.
(transitive) a variant spelling of forgo
Derived Forms
foregoer, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for forego
v.

"to go before," Old English foregan "to go before," from fore- + go. The similarly constructed foredone "killed, destroyed," now is archaic, replaced by done for. Related: Foregoing; foregone.

Phrase foregone conclusion popularized in "Othello" [III.iii], but Shakespeare's sense was not necessarily the main modern one of "a decision already formed before the case is argued." Othello says it of Cassio's dream, and it is clear from the context that Othello means Cassio actually has been in bed with Desdemona before he allegedly dreamed it.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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