foretaste

[n. fawr-teyst, fohr-; v. fawr-teyst, fohr-]
noun
1.
a slight and partial experience, knowledge, or taste of something to come in the future; anticipation.
verb (used with object), foretasted, foretasting.
2.
to have some advance experience or knowledge of (something to come).

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English fortaste. See fore-, taste

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
foretaste
 
n
1.  an early but limited experience or awareness of something to come
 
vb
2.  (tr) to have a foretaste of

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

foretaste
early 15c., from fore- + taste. As a verb, from mid-15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It is a foretaste of what human brain will accomplish when mankind is restored
  back to holiness.
As someone so cogently remarked: a foretaste of what's happening nationwide.
The article was a foretaste of recriminations expected in the months ahead.
The breeze is a foretaste of the sea, which has a two-sided presence in the
  movie.
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