frailty

[freyl-tee, frey-uhl-]
noun, plural frailties for 3.
1.
the quality or state of being frail.
2.
moral weakness; liability to yield to temptation.
3.
a fault resulting from moral weakness: frailties of the human flesh.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English frailte, frelete < Old French frailete < Latin fragilitāt- (stem of fragilitās). See frail1, -ity

overfrailty, noun


1. delicacy, weakness, fragility. 2. susceptibility, suggestibility. 3. flaw, defect.
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World English Dictionary
frailty (ˈfreɪltɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
1.  physical or moral weakness
2.  (often plural) a fault symptomatic of moral weakness

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

frailty
mid-14c., from O.Fr. frailté, from L. fragilitatem, from fragilis (see fragility). Related: Frailties.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It's no secret that alcohol is often used as a balm for human frailty.
Physical frailty is expected, and can be coped with.
She caught both the fever and the frailty of the great trio.
And he was troubled: by drink, by drugs and by physical frailty.
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