frangible

[fran-juh-buhl]
adjective
easily broken; breakable: Most frangible toys are not suitable for young children.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Old French, derivative of Latin frangere to break; see -ible

frangibility, frangibleness, noun
nonfrangibility, noun
nonfrangible, adjective

frangible, fungible.


fragile, frail.
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World English Dictionary
frangible (ˈfrændʒɪbəl)
 
adj
breakable or fragile
 
[C15: from Old French, ultimately from Latin frangere to break]
 
frangi'bility
 
n
 
'frangibleness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

frangible
1440, from M.Fr. frangible, from M.L. frangibilis, from L. frangere "to break" (see fraction).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Frangible bullets are designed to crumble into small pieces on impact with a rigid target or backstop.
Breakaway light poles rely on frangible transformer bases to provide the breakaway feature.
Lamps and frangible fittings may be obtained from the equipment supplier.
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