Try Our Apps


Gobble up these 8 terms for eating


[fren-zee] /ˈfrɛn zi/
noun, plural frenzies.
extreme mental agitation; wild excitement or derangement.
a fit or spell of violent mental excitement; a paroxysm characteristic of or resulting from a mania:
He is subject to these frenzies several times a year.
verb (used with object), frenzied, frenzying.
to drive to frenzy; make frantic:
She was frenzied by fear when she smelled the smoke.
Origin of frenzy
1300-50; Middle English frenesie < Old French < Late Latin phrenēsis < Late Greek, for Greek phrenîtis; see phrenitis
Related forms
frenzily, adverb
2. madness, insanity, lunacy, aberration; rage, fury, raving.
1. calm. 2. sanity. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for frenzy
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • When she realized the significance of our words, she gave way to a frenzy of anger.

    Forty Years of 'Spy' Leslie Ward
  • Their walk was a delight to him, their roaring gallop a frenzy of eager sensation.

    Thoroughbreds W. A. Fraser
  • Yes, a curious creature whom I happened to meet—and who took pity on the state of frenzy I was in at that time.

    Monsieur Cherami Charles Paul de Kock
  • Nor, in the blindness of his frenzy, had he seen when she had gone nor whither she went.

  • He turned and galloped up the slope in a frenzy of fear highly ludicrous under the circumstances.

    Peggy Raymond's Vacation Harriet L. (Harriet Lummis) Smith
British Dictionary definitions for frenzy


noun (pl) -zies
violent mental derangement
wild excitement or agitation; distraction
a bout of wild or agitated activity: a frenzy of preparations
verb -zies, -zying, -zied
(transitive) to make frantic; drive into a frenzy
Word Origin
C14: from Old French frenesie, from Late Latin phrēnēsis madness, delirium, from Late Greek, ultimately from Greek phrēn mind; compare frenetic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for frenzy

mid-14c., "delirium, insanity," from Old French frenesie, from Medieval Latin phrenesia, from phrenesis, back-formation from Latin phreneticus "delirious" (see frenetic). Meaning "excited state of mind" is from c.1400.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for frenzy

Scrabble Words With Friends