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frieze1

[freez] /friz/
noun
1.
Architecture.
  1. the part of a classical entablature between the architrave and the cornice, usually decorated with sculpture in low relief.
  2. any decorative band on an outside wall, broader than a stringcourse and bearing lettering, sculpture, etc.
2.
any decorative band at the top or beneath the cornice of an interior wall, a piece of furniture, etc.
3.
Furniture. skirt (def 6b).
Origin of frieze1
1555-1565
1555-65; < Middle French frise, perhaps < Medieval Latin phrygium, frigium, frisium embroidered cloth, embroidery, Latin Phrygium, neuter of Phrygius Phrygian
Can be confused
freeze, frieze.

frieze2

[freez] /friz/
noun
1.
a heavy, napped woolen cloth for coats.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English frise < Old French; see frieze1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for frieze
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The frieze contains a number of landscape and marine views, with many figures of men and animals painted on a yellow ground.

    Old Rome Robert Burn
  • Triglyph, the channelled feature in the frieze of the Doric order.

    Architecture Thomas Roger Smith
  • They are copied from the frieze of the Tower of the Winds at Athens.

    Wind and Weather Alexander McAdie
  • The entablature is a positive triumph in cornice, frieze and architrave.

  • Above them curves a large arch, with three pierced pendentives and a frieze delicately carved with birds and angels.

    The Story of Rouen Sir Theodore Andrea Cook
British Dictionary definitions for frieze

frieze1

/friːz/
noun
1.
(architect)
  1. the horizontal band between the architrave and cornice of a classical entablature, esp one that is decorated with sculpture
  2. the upper part of the wall of a room, below the cornice, esp one that is decorated
2.
any ornamental band or strip on a wall
Word Origin
C16: from French frise, perhaps from Medieval Latin frisium, changed from Latin Phrygium Phrygian (work), from Phrygia Phrygia, famous for embroidery in gold

frieze2

/friːz/
noun
1.
a heavy woollen fabric with a long nap, used for coats, etc
Word Origin
C15: from Old French frise, from Middle Dutch friese, vriese, perhaps from Vriese Frisian
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for frieze
n.

"sculptured horizontal band in architecture," 1560s, from Middle French frise, originally "a ruff," from Medieval Latin frisium "embroidered border," variant of frigium, probably from Latin Phrygium "Phrygian, Phrygian work," from Phrygia, the ancient country in Asia Minor known for its embroidery (cf. Phrygiae vestes "ornate garments"). Meaning "decorative band along the top of a wall" was in Old French.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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frieze in Culture
frieze [(freez)]

An ornamental band that runs around a building. Friezes are usually on the exterior of a building and are often sculpted in bas-relief.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Word Value for frieze

18
18
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