follow Dictionary.com

9 Q Without U Words for Words With Friends

frock

[frok] /frɒk/
noun
1.
a gown or dress worn by a girl or woman.
2.
a loose outer garment worn by peasants and workers; smock.
3.
a coarse outer garment with large sleeves, worn by monks.
verb (used with object)
5.
to provide with, or clothe in, a frock.
6.
to invest with priestly or clerical office.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English froke < Old French froc < Frankish; compare Old Saxon, Old High German hroc coat
Related forms
frockless, adjective
underfrock, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for frock
  • Since the era of frock coats and buckled shoes, finance has been knocked back by booms and busts every ten years or so.
  • He wore a long frock coat, a white shirt and an antique-style tie.
  • Figures in frock coats wielding silver spoons appear on the horizon they seek a duel where three parties meet.
  • Figures in frock coats wielding silver spoons appear on the horizon.
  • He is brilliantly dressed in a new fashionable frock-coat, with white waistcoat and grey trousers.
  • But his motive for speaking and writing had not changed with the shedding of his frock.
  • We suddenly felt a bit silly in our diaphanous garden-party frock.
British Dictionary definitions for frock

frock

/frɒk/
noun
1.
a girl's or woman's dress
2.
a loose garment of several types, such as a peasant's smock
3.
a coarse wide-sleeved outer garment worn by members of some religious orders
verb
4.
(transitive) to invest (a person) with the office or status of a cleric
Word Origin
C14: from Old French froc; related to Old Saxon, Old High German hroc coat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for frock
n.

mid-14c., from Old French froc "a monk's habit" (12c.), of unknown origin; perhaps from Frankish *hrok or some other Germanic source (cf. Old High German hroc "mantle, coat;" Old Norse rokkr, Old English rocc, Old Frisian rokk, German Rock "coat"), from PIE root *rug- "to spin."

Another theory traces it to Medieval Latin floccus, from Latin floccus "flock of wool." Meaning "outer garment for women or children" is from 1530s. Frock-coat attested by 1823.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for frock

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for frock

14
15
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with frock

Nearby words for frock