Ful

Ful

[fool]
noun, plural Fuls (especially collectively) Ful.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

-ful

a suffix meaning “full of,” “characterized by” (shameful; beautiful; careful; thoughtful ); “tending to,” “able to” (wakeful; harmful ); “as much as will fill” (spoonful ).

Origin:
Middle English, Old English -full, -ful, representing full, ful full1


The plurals of nouns ending in -ful are usually formed by adding -s to the suffix: two cupfuls; two scant teaspoonfuls. Perhaps influenced by the phrase in which a noun is followed by the adjective full (both arms full of packages), some speakers and writers pluralize such nouns by adding -s before the suffix: two cupsful.
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World English Dictionary
-ful
 
suffix
1.  (forming adjectives) full of or characterized by: painful; spiteful; restful
2.  (forming adjectives) able or tending to: helpful; useful
3.  (forming nouns) indicating as much as will fill the thing specified: mouthful; spoonful
 
usage  Where the amount held by a spoon, etc, is used as a rough unit of measurement, the correct form is spoonful, etc: take a spoonful of this medicine every day. Spoon full is used in a sentence such as he held out a spoon full of dark liquid, where full of describes the spoon. A plural form such as spoonfuls is preferred by many speakers and writers to spoonsful

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

-ful
O.E. -full, -ful, from suffix use of full (adj.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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