fundament

[fuhn-duh-muhnt]
noun
1.
the buttocks.
2.
the anus.
3.
a base or basic principle; underlying part; foundation.

Origin:
1250–1300; < Latin fundāmentum foundation; replacing Middle English fondement < Old French. See found2, -ment

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World English Dictionary
fundament (ˈfʌndəmənt)
 
n
1.  euphemistic, facetious or the buttocks
2.  the natural features of the earth's surface, unaltered by man
3.  a base or foundation, esp of a building
4.  a theory, principle, or underlying basis
 
[C13: from Latin fundāmentum foundation, from fundāre to found²]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fundament
c.1300, "buttocks, anus," from L. fundamentum, from fundare "to found" (see found (1)). So called because it is where one sits.
"Alle þe filþ of his magh ['maw'] salle breste out atte his fondament for drede." ["Cursor Mundi," c.1340]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

fundament fun·da·ment (fŭn'də-mənt)
n.
See anus.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
All other announcements are a pain in the fundament.
Lying: it's the fundament of all fiction--and what comedians, those unbeautiful
  little people, do to get attention.
It wasn't only a matter of embodying a nation, though that was the fundament of
  the electoral arrangement.
There is too much focus on useful hints but with little or no theoretical
  fundament.
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