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furrow

[fur-oh, fuhr-oh] /ˈfɜr oʊ, ˈfʌr oʊ/
noun
1.
a narrow groove made in the ground, especially by a plow.
2.
a narrow groovelike or trenchlike depression in any surface:
the furrows of a wrinkled face.
verb (used with object)
3.
to make a furrow or furrows in.
4.
to make wrinkles in (the face):
to furrow one's brow.
verb (used without object)
5.
to become furrowed.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English forwe, furgh, Old English furh; cognate with Old Frisian furch, Old High German fur(u)h (German Furche), Latin porca ridge between furrows
Related forms
furrower, noun
furrowless, adjective
furrowlike, adjective
furrowy, adjective
unfurrowed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for furrow
  • Along its line of attachment to the buccal epithelium is a shallow groove, the dental furrow.
  • Everyone plows the straight-ahead furrow to work or home.
  • Consultants have rethought strategy to the nth degree but seldom furrow their brows about sales.
  • Their friends may give them strange looks, so teach them to clench their fists and furrow their brow to sell it.
  • With silicone, once a wrinkle or furrow is flattened, it stays that way.
  • His determination to plough a clean furrow between socialism and capitalism has the ring of truth.
  • In place of gunplay, brainiacs furrow their brows and stare into space in an effort to connect the dots.
  • And if you furrow your nose, you can still whiff the infectious high spirits that must have gone into its writing.
  • All these are embedded in his every furrow and gesture.
  • They have little oil, so they furrow their brows to find alternatives.
British Dictionary definitions for furrow

furrow

/ˈfʌrəʊ/
noun
1.
a long narrow trench made in the ground by a plough or a trench resembling this
2.
any long deep groove, esp a deep wrinkle on the forehead
verb
3.
to develop or cause to develop furrows or wrinkles
4.
to make a furrow or furrows in (land)
Derived Forms
furrower, noun
furrowless, adjective
furrow-like, furrowy, adjective
Word Origin
Old English furh; related to Old Frisian furch, Old Norse for, Old High German furuh furrow, Latin porca ridge between furrows
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for furrow
furrow
O.E. furh "furrow," from P.Gmc. *furkh- (cf. O.N. for "furrow, drainage ditch;" M.Du. vore, Du. voor; Ger. Furche "furrow"), from PIE *prk- (cf. L. porca "ridge between two furrows," O.Ir. -rech, Welsh rhych "furrow"). "Some scholars connect this word with L. porcus, Eng. FARROW, assigning to the common root the sense 'to root like a swine.' " [OED] The verb meaning "to make wrinkles in one's face, brow, etc." is from 1590s. Related: Furrowed; furrowing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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furrow in Medicine

furrow fur·row (fûr'ō, fŭr'ō)
n.

  1. A rut, groove, or narrow depression.

  2. A deep wrinkle in the skin, as on the forehead.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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furrow in the Bible

an opening in the ground made by the plough (Ps. 65:10; Hos. 10:4, 10).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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12
13
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