follow Dictionary.com

8 Wintry Words to Defrost Your Vocabulary

furrow

[fur-oh, fuhr-oh] /ˈfɜr oʊ, ˈfʌr oʊ/
noun
1.
a narrow groove made in the ground, especially by a plow.
2.
a narrow groovelike or trenchlike depression in any surface:
the furrows of a wrinkled face.
verb (used with object)
3.
to make a furrow or furrows in.
4.
to make wrinkles in (the face):
to furrow one's brow.
verb (used without object)
5.
to become furrowed.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English forwe, furgh, Old English furh; cognate with Old Frisian furch, Old High German fur(u)h (German Furche), Latin porca ridge between furrows
Related forms
furrower, noun
furrowless, adjective
furrowlike, adjective
furrowy, adjective
unfurrowed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for furrowed
  • Some groups furrowed their heads as they realized the data did not match the prediction they had made moments before.
  • But economists look to the future with furrowed brows.
  • Smooth gray bark can become ridged and furrowed with age.
  • And they are no longer the only ones with furrowed brows.
  • With a face glazed in placidity, bothered reactions lose their furrowed impact.
  • The branding change furrowed many a knowledgeable brow in the computer industry.
  • Notice the suddenly furrowed brow, the barely perceptible stumble.
  • Forehead lifts are cosmetic procedures that plastic surgeons typically perform to smooth furrowed brows.
  • The brouhaha in question, unfortunately, is likely to inspire more stifled yawns than furrowed brows or raised consciousnesses.
  • One arm is flung across her chronically furrowed brow.
British Dictionary definitions for furrowed

furrow

/ˈfʌrəʊ/
noun
1.
a long narrow trench made in the ground by a plough or a trench resembling this
2.
any long deep groove, esp a deep wrinkle on the forehead
verb
3.
to develop or cause to develop furrows or wrinkles
4.
to make a furrow or furrows in (land)
Derived Forms
furrower, noun
furrowless, adjective
furrow-like, furrowy, adjective
Word Origin
Old English furh; related to Old Frisian furch, Old Norse for, Old High German furuh furrow, Latin porca ridge between furrows
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for furrowed

furrow

n.

Old English furh "furrow, trench," from Proto-Germanic *furkh- (cf. Old Frisian furch "furrow;" Middle Dutch vore, Dutch voor; German Furche "furrow;" Old Norse for "furrow, drainage ditch"), from PIE *perk- (cf. Latin porca "ridge between two furrows," Old Irish -rech, Welsh rhych "furrow"). "Some scholars connect this word with Latin porcus, Eng. FARROW, assigning to the common root the sense 'to root like a swine.' " [OED]

v.

early 15c., "to plow," from furrow (n.). Meaning "to make wrinkles in one's face, brow, etc." is from 1590s. Related: Furrowed; furrowing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
furrowed in Medicine

furrow fur·row (fûr'ō, fŭr'ō)
n.

  1. A rut, groove, or narrow depression.

  2. A deep wrinkle in the skin, as on the forehead.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
furrowed in the Bible

an opening in the ground made by the plough (Ps. 65:10; Hos. 10:4, 10).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for furrow

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for furrowed

15
16
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with furrowed

Nearby words for furrowed