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gale1

[geyl] /geɪl/
noun
1.
a very strong wind.
2.
Meteorology. a wind of 32–63 miles per hour (14–28 m/sec).
3.
a noisy outburst:
a gale of laughter filled the room.
4.
Archaic. a gentle breeze.
Origin of gale1
Norwegian dialect
1540-1550
1540-50; perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian dialect geil uproar, unrest, boiling
Synonyms
3. burst, eruption, outbreak, fit, gust.

gale2

[geyl] /geɪl/
noun
Origin
before 1000; Middle English gail, Old English gagel; cognate with German Gagel

Gale

[geyl] /geɪl/
noun
1.
Zona
[zoh-nuh] /ˈzoʊ nə/ (Show IPA),
1874–1938, U.S. novelist, short-story writer, playwright, and poet.
2.
a female or male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for gale
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He was dreadfully overcome when Captain gale announced his errand.

    Old Jack W.H.G. Kingston
  • That night the gale broke, and before morning it had materially moderated.

    Ned Myers James Fenimore Cooper
  • What direction do you think will the gale come from, if it comes at all?

  • At Zierikzee, in Zeeland, a whale has been stranded by a high tide and a gale of wind.

    Albert Durer T. Sturge Moore
  • The wind was blowing hard, increasing in time to quite a gale.

    Story of Chester Lawrence Nephi Anderson
British Dictionary definitions for gale

gale1

/ɡeɪl/
noun
1.
a strong wind, specifically one of force seven to ten on the Beaufort scale or from 45 to 90 kilometres per hour
2.
(often pl) a loud outburst, esp of laughter
3.
(archaic, poetic) a gentle breeze
Word Origin
C16: of unknown origin

gale2

/ɡeɪl/
noun
1.
short for sweet gale
Word Origin
Old English gagel; related to Middle Low German gagel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gale
n.

"storm at sea," 1540s, from gaile "wind," origin uncertain, perhaps from Old Norse gol "breeze," or Old Danish gal "bad, furious" (often used of weather), from Old Norse galinn "bewitched." Or perhaps it is from Old English galan "to sing" (the second element in nightingale), or giellan "to yell." In technical meteorological use, a wind between 32 and 63 miles per hour.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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