gallantry

[gal-uhn-tree]
noun, plural gallantries.
1.
dashing courage; heroic bravery; noble-minded behavior.
2.
gallant or courtly attention to women.
3.
a gallant act, action, or speech.

Origin:
1600–10; < Middle French galanterie, equivalent to Old French galant (see gallant) + -erie -ry


1. daring, valor, heroism. 2. chivalry, courtliness.


1. cowardice.
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World English Dictionary
gallantry (ˈɡæləntrɪ)
 
n , pl -ries
1.  conspicuous courage, esp in war: the gallantry of the troops
2.  polite attentiveness to women
3.  a gallant action, speech, etc

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gallantry
1590s, "fine appearance," from Fr. galanterie, from O.Fr. galant (see gallant). Meaning "gallant behavior" is from 1630s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
If virtue is its own reward, gallantry is also occasionally paid off in the
  same coin.
Gallantry was overcome by the need to sit down at a table for the interview,
  and my addiction to caffeine.
Along with their foolishness, it sees their gallantry.
And that is the thing which gives it, as a picture, a plain and moving
  gallantry.
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