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galliard

or gaillard

[gal-yerd] /ˈgæl yərd/
noun
1.
a spirited dance for two dancers in triple rhythm, common in the 16th and 17th centuries.
Origin of galliard
1525-1535
1525-35; < Middle French gaillard, noun use of adj.: lively, vigorous (> Middle English gaillard, late Middle English galyarde), probably < Gallo-Romance *galia < Celtic (compare MIr gal warlike ardor, valor); see -ard
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for galliard
Historical Examples
  • William Johnstone of Wamphray, called the galliard, was a noted freebooter.

  • To avoid this, galliard had swung him towards the bed, and hurled him on to it.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
  • With his eyes still fixed in a gaze of stupefaction upon galliard's face, Kenneth took the paper.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
  • galliard bowed his head; then, turning, he took the Bible from the table.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
  • Anon they went yet paler than their wont, as galliard rested the point of his sword against the fellow's neck.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
  • Startled by her words and the tone of them, galliard turned his head that he might observe her.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
  • "It is no lie," Joseph cried, in accents so earnest that some of the unbelief passed again from galliard's face.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
  • He realized that he was mastered, and that at any moment galliard might send home his blade.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
  • Then galliard spoke at last, and the mildness of his tone filled Kenneth with a new dread.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
  • Despite himself, galliard winced, and his glance fell before Hogan's.

    The Tavern Knight Rafael Sabatini
British Dictionary definitions for galliard

galliard

/ˈɡæljəd/
noun
1.
a spirited dance in triple time for two persons, popular in the 16th and 17th centuries
2.
a piece of music composed for this dance
adjective
3.
(archaic) lively; spirited
Word Origin
C14: from Old French gaillard valiant, perhaps of Celtic origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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10
13
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