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gammon1

[gam-uh n] /ˈgæm ən/
noun
1.
the game of backgammon.
2.
a victory in which the winner throws off all his or her pieces before the opponent throws off any.
verb (used with object)
3.
to win a gammon over.
Origin
1720-1730
1720-30; perhaps special use of Middle English gamen game1

gammon2

[gam-uh n] /ˈgæm ən/
noun
1.
a smoked or cured ham.
2.
the lower end of a side of bacon.
Origin
1480-90; < Old French gambon ham (French jambon), derivative of gambe; see jamb1

gammon3

[gam-uh n] /ˈgæm ən/
noun
1.
deceitful nonsense; bosh.
verb (used without object)
2.
to talk gammon.
3.
to make pretense.
verb (used with object)
4.
to humbug.
Origin
1710-20; perhaps special use of gammon1
Related forms
gammoner, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for gammon

gammon1

/ˈɡæmən/
noun
1.
a cured or smoked ham
2.
the hindquarter of a side of bacon, cooked either whole or cut into large rashers
Word Origin
C15: from Old Northern French gambon, from gambe leg; see gambrel

gammon2

/ˈɡæmən/
noun
1.
a double victory in backgammon in which one player throws off all his pieces before his opponent throws any
2.
(archaic) the game of backgammon
verb
3.
(transitive) to score a gammon over
Word Origin
C18: probably special use of Middle English gamengame1

gammon3

/ˈɡæmən/
noun
1.
deceitful nonsense; humbug
verb
2.
to deceive (a person)
Derived Forms
gammoner, noun
Word Origin
C18: perhaps special use of gammon²

gammon4

/ˈɡæmən/
verb
1.
(transitive) (nautical) to fix (a bowsprit) to the stemhead of a vessel
Word Origin
C18: perhaps related to gammon1, with reference to the tying up of a ham
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gammon
n.

early 15c., "ham or haunch of a swine," from Old North French gambon "ham" (French jambon), from gambe "leg," from Late Latin gamba "leg of an animal" (see gambol (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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