gastropod

[gas-truh-pod]
noun
1.
any mollusk of the class Gastropoda, comprising the snails, whelks, slugs, etc.
adjective
2.
Also, gastropodous [ga-strop-uh-duhs] . belonging or pertaining to the gastropods.

Origin:
1820–30; < Neo-Latin Gast(e)ropoda a class of mollusks. See gastro-, -pod

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
gastropod or gasteropod (ˈɡæstrəˌpɒd)
 
n
1.  any mollusc of the class Gastropoda, typically having a flattened muscular foot for locomotion and a head that bears stalked eyes. The class includes the snails, whelks, limpets, and slugs
 
adj
2.  of, relating to, or belonging to the Gastropoda
 
gasteropod or gasteropod
 
n
 
adj
 
gastropodan or gasteropod
 
adj, —n
 
gas'tropodous or gasteropod
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gastropod
1826, gasteropod, from Gk. gaster (gen. gastros) "stomach" + pous (gen. podos) "foot" (see foot). From the ventral position of the mollusk's "foot."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
gastropod   (gās'trə-pŏd')  Pronunciation Key 
Any of various carnivorous or herbivorous mollusks of the class Gastropoda, having a head with eyes and feelers and a muscular foot on the underside of its body with which it moves. Most gastropods are aquatic, but some have adapted to life on land. Gastropods include snails, which have a coiled shell, and slugs, which have a greatly reduced shell or none at all.

Our Living Language  : Snails, conchs, whelks, and many other similar animals with shells are all called gastropods by scientists. The word gastropod comes from Greek and means "stomach foot," a name that owes its existence to the unusual anatomy of snails. Snails have a broad flat muscular "foot" used for support and for forward movement. This foot runs along the underside of the animal—essentially along its belly. The Greek elements gastro-, "stomach," and -pod, "foot," are found in many other scientific names, such as gastritis (an inflammation of the stomach) and sauropod ("lizard foot," a type of dinosaur).
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Otherwise, the fish it preys on would swim away to die, and the slow-moving
  gastropod would have nothing for its efforts.
To protect its soft abdomen, each crab carries its house around, usually an
  abandoned gastropod shell.
Protection mechanisms of the iron-plated armor of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent
  gastropod.
So, if you've harbored a secret desire to paint an intimate portrait of a
  gastropod, now is your big chance.
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