gingivitis

[jin-juh-vahy-tis]
noun Pathology.
inflammation of the gums.

Origin:
1870–75; < Neo-Latin; see gingiva, -itis

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Collins
World English Dictionary
gingivitis (ˌdʒɪndʒɪˈvaɪtɪs)
 
n
inflammation of the gums

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gingivitis
1874, from L. gingiva "gums" + -itis (q.v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

gingivitis gin·gi·vi·tis (jĭn'jə-vī'tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the gums, characterized by redness and swelling.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
gingivitis   (jĭn'jə-vī'tĭs)  Pronunciation Key 
Inflammation of the gums, characterized by redness and swelling.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

gingivitis

inflammation of the gums (gingivae). Symptoms include tender, sometimes swollen, gums that bleed easily. Areas of tissue destruction (necrosis) or ulceration may develop, and fever and halitosis may be present in severe disease. The most common cause of gingivitis is the accumulation of dental plaque on exposed tooth surfaces. The form of gingivitis known as trench mouth (Vincent's gingivitis) is believed to be caused by a spirochete, Borrelia, and a bacterium, Fusobacterium, acting in symbiosis on previously weakened gum tissue. General infections, poor tooth alignment (malocclusion), poor dental hygiene, and faulty dentures are other causes of gingivitis. In some cases, gingivitis occurs as a result of another disease, such as diabetes mellitus, leukemia or similar blood dyscrasias, or vitamin deficiency

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Dental caries, gangrene, gingivitis and sleeping sickness could merit mention.
Tooth decay and gingivitis, among other dental disease, is encouraged by extended periods of dry mouth.
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